The correct post title for this should be “native people’s home site in Plymouth MA” or “Wampanoag Homesite Plimoth MA” but since most people still refer to Native people as Indians I decided to title it so people can search for it.

My daughter had Tuesday off from school so we toured the Wampanoag Homesite and we had such a great time we returned today with my wife and other daughter.  Being able to actually see how the Native people live, eat, and do their daily tasks was a real eye opener!  Watching my daughter ask them dozens of questions and getting easy to understand answers was just priceless!

Pictures of an Indian Village

Once you arrive at the start of the tour the is the sign in the picture informing you of some rules which I would suggest following.  It was hard for me to get use to call the Native people something other than “Indian” since it is the term that I used for the past 38 years of my life.  After a while it became entertaining listening to people correct their selves midway through saying Indian.  The tour starts on a long windy path and ends up in the Wampanoag homesite about 5 minutes later.

how Indian people cook

The homesite consist of a half dozen or so buildings that are constructed of cedar trees and covered with bark.  The buildings last for about 20 years before they are burned down to return them to the earth.  There are between 3 and 8 Native people “on staff” to answer your questions.  While they are answering your questions they are conducting their day to day chores like this lady who is cooking a rabbit.

Indian cook stove

Indian House

Inside of one of these Wampanoag homes we listened to an elderly Wampanoag lady talk about their lifestyle and what everyone did for chores.  The sides of the building have full lenght benches that are covered with deer hides that they use as beds.  There are 3 vents on the roof so depending on the weather they can have 1-3 fires going to keep them warm.  Since we toured this village in early November it was cold but the one fire kept us nice and warm!  I could go on for pages about how we enjoyed this tour but in my opinion you really need to visit it on your own to get all that this tour offers.

Indian Bed

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4 Responses

  1. 1 Guillaume Foutry
    2008 Nov 18

    If that can change the perception that so many people have regarding Native Americans traditional way of life, that it is an improvement. The Avoid Harmful Stereotypes sign should be used for so many other things. Really a good idea!

  2. 2 Eco Tours
    2008 Nov 18

    The signs actually got a bunch of attention, most people stopped to read it. At one point a bunch of kids came down a trial making war whooping sounds (I forget the term) and one of the Native staff members had them stop in a polite and discrete manner.

  3. 3 greenauthors.com
    2008 Dec 15

    Indian Village in Plymouth MA | Eco Tours…

    The correct post title for this should be “native people’s home site in Plymouth MA” or “Wampanoag Homesite Plimoth MA” but since most people still refer to Native people as Indians I decided to title it so people can search for it….

  4. 4 Chief Rain Bear
    2011 Sep 06

    When this country has a Native American as President, thats when this county will lead the globe in love and fairness.


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